Sir Patrick Vallance is in favor of Labour's Accelerated Green Energy Initiative

In a major show of support, Sir Patrick Vallance, the former chief scientific adviser, has thrown his support behind Labour's ambitious green energy plan, insisting that the quest for net zero must continue with the same urgency as the development of Covid-19 -vaccine.

Vallance, who resigned last year, has endorsed Sir Keir Starmer's pledge to decarbonise Britain's electricity supply by 2030 – a full five years ahead of the current government's target. This accelerated timeline has drawn criticism from conservatives, who have labeled the proposal “crazy, bad and dangerous.”

Vallance, known for his crucial role in the response to the pandemic, wrote in *The Times* that Labour's target is achievable and necessary for the country's future. He warned against the Conservative strategy of delaying net-zero policy, warning: “If we choose to move slowly, others will provide the answers, and we will ultimately end up buying the solutions.”

In 2022, fossil fuels accounted for 33% of Britain's electricity generation. Current government plans aim to switch to renewable energy by 2035. Labor is proposing to bring this target forward by five years, claiming this will reduce energy bills, generate jobs and boost economic growth.

While some energy experts and Conservative voices have raised concerns about the feasibility and economic impact of Labour's plan, Vallance remains optimistic. He acknowledges the technological and logistical obstacles, but emphasizes that with the right approach, a clean energy system is within reach by 2030.

“Achieving this goal will require the Prime Minister's support and strong, responsible leadership,” Vallance said, emphasizing the need for a coordinated effort similar to the vaccine task force.

Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer has welcomed Vallance's support, calling it “fantastic”, and shadow energy minister Ed Miliband praised Vallance's recognition of the government's capabilities in overcoming key challenges.

Vallance's plea goes beyond mere support; he has been actively working with the Royal Academy of Engineering to explore how to accelerate the decarbonisation of the energy system. His vision is clear: “This mission transcends party politics. It is about our safety, the cost of living, employment and the climate.”

A Conservative source criticized Labour's decarbonisation policy, calling it unprecedented among major economies and a potential threat to energy security. They argue that a rapid transition could lead to higher consumer costs and greater dependence on infrastructure from countries such as China.

Despite these objections, Vallance is determined. “Moving quickly to a clean energy system is an investment, not just a cost,” he asserted. “Achieving energy self-sufficiency will protect us from the volatility of the international fossil fuel market.”

Vallance concluded with a call to action: “This is a challenge that we must embrace with determination and innovation, drawing on the expertise of our scientists, engineers and the private sector. The rewards – lower energy bills, job creation and climate leadership – are enormous.”

His strong support provides a compelling narrative for Labour's green energy vision, and underlines the need for urgent and decisive action to secure Britain's energy future.

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