The 'Hostage Tape' trend is going viral on TikTok, raising concerns among doctors

Videos on social media are touting the benefits of taping your mouth shut while you sleep, but some doctors aren't convinced.

Hostage Tape, a brand that sells mouth tapes, has gone viral on TikTok for promoting the sleep benefits allegedly associated with its products. In a tongue-and-check ad viewed nearly three million times, the company ironically tells viewers not to use its products.

“Don't do it. Please don't tape your mouth while you sleep,” one man says in the TikTok video, before listing its benefits. “It will lead to better sleep, better muscle recovery and a whole host of other benefits.”

'Just don't do it. But if you're wondering how to do it, get your Hostage Tape.'

TIKTOK TRENDING QUESTION ABOUT 'BEING STUCK IN A FOREST' WITH 'A MAN OR A BEAR' PROVIDES STRATEGIC TIPS

Hostage Tape, a brand that sells mouth tapes, has gone viral on TikTok for promising users a better sleep experience. (iStock / Hostage Tape)

The video's comments section was filled with critics and fans alike.

“This stuff is totally legit,” one person wrote. “I've been recording for about a year and this is the most comfortable and the best. It has transformed my life 'overnight' (lol).”

“[A]It will be fun and playful until you wake up with a stuffy nose and sleep paralysis at the same time,” one skeptic wrote.

According to the company's website, Hostage Tape mouth tape is breathable, hypoallergenic, and easy to remove — despite the creepy name attached to it. The tape is said to train sleepers to nap with their mouths closed, and can be used at the same time with CPAP machines.

THREE WOMEN – 41, 55 AND 64 YEARS – SHARE THEIR SECRETS FOR BETTER HEALTH AND LONGLIFE

“It may seem bizarre, but our bodies are built to breathe through our noses,” reads the Hostage Tape website. “Research shows that most people breathe through their mouth while sleeping.”

“Mouth breathing has also been shown to increase the risk of developing sleep apnea and other medical conditions,” the description adds.

“By applying a flexible and breathable piece of tape, you can prevent mouth breathing and possibly reduce the complications associated with it.”

Split image of Hostage Tape products

Hostage Tape says its mouth tapes are safe and comfortable to use. (Hostage tape)

In an email to Fox News Digital, Hostage Tape shared that it is endorsed by a major ENT clinic in Southern California. The company also sent a positive letter from a doctor about his mouth tape.

“It is important to emphasize the positive aspect of using mouth tape: for people who can comfortably close their mouth and breathe gently through their nose without resistance, this product can be a game-changer,” the letter said. “In most cases, even patients with conditions such as a deviated septum can breathe through their nose for extended periods of time, especially during sleep, when it is not rigorous activity.”

Despite the brand's reported benefits, Fox News medical contributor Dr. Marc Siegel says the trend is 'dangerous'.

“If the nose or sinuses are blocked, or if there is an anatomical blockage such as a polyp, a blocked sinus or a deviated septum, this can interfere with complete breathing,” Siegel told Fox News Digital. “Mouth breathing is essential as a backup.”

Siegel, clinical professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center, pointed out that nasal breathing at night does have some health benefits. Dr. Fox News medical contributor Janette Nesheiwat shared some of Siegel's concerns and recommended that it should never be used on children.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN UP FOR OUR HEALTH NEWSLETTER

“Some potential serious concerns I have with mouth taping include airway obstruction, difficulty breathing if you have a stuffy nose, allergies, or if there is something wrong with your nose that can restrict airflow and make it more dangerous at night can be,” Nesheiwat explains. “If you have undiagnosed sleep apnea and you use mouth tape, it could potentially worsen your sleep apnea by restricting airflow and making sleep apnea worse.”

But she added that nasal breathing can be beneficial for overall respiratory health.

Split view of a man sleeping with tape on his mouth and Hostage Tape products

Although nasal breathing has benefits, Dr. warns. Marc Siegel says mouth tape can be dangerous to use. (iStock / Hostage Tape)

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FOX NEWS APP

“I think it's critical to see [doctors] first for a sleep study test to determine the cause of your symptoms, which will prompt you to try mouth taping,” she advised. I do not recommend taping the mouth because we must first determine the underlying cause of the symptoms.

For more health articles, visit www.foxnews.com/health.

Related Posts

  • Health
  • June 18, 2024
  • 2 views
  • 5 minutes Read
The blood test for Alzheimer's ensures faster diagnoses and high accuracy at Mayo Clinic

Join Fox News to access this content Plus special access to select articles and other premium content with your account – for free. By entering your email address and pressing…

  • Health
  • June 18, 2024
  • 2 views
  • 3 minutes Read
Kansas is suing Pfizer for 'misleading statements' about its COVID vaccine

The state of Kansas filed a lawsuit against pharmaceutical company Pfizer on Monday, alleging the company made “misleading claims” about the effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccine and the risks associated…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You Missed

The blood test for Alzheimer's ensures faster diagnoses and high accuracy at Mayo Clinic

  • June 18, 2024
The blood test for Alzheimer's ensures faster diagnoses and high accuracy at Mayo Clinic

Apple embraces open-source AI with twenty Core ML models on the Hugging Face platform

  • June 18, 2024
Apple embraces open-source AI with twenty Core ML models on the Hugging Face platform

The European election results raise fears about the weakening of climate ambitions

  • June 18, 2024
The European election results raise fears about the weakening of climate ambitions

Kansas is suing Pfizer for 'misleading statements' about its COVID vaccine

  • June 18, 2024
Kansas is suing Pfizer for 'misleading statements' about its COVID vaccine

Remco Evenepoel: The Tour de France contender who might have played for Belgium at Euro 2024

  • June 18, 2024
Remco Evenepoel: The Tour de France contender who might have played for Belgium at Euro 2024

Juneteenth Hack brings together black artists with augmented reality technology

  • June 18, 2024
Juneteenth Hack brings together black artists with augmented reality technology

The 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris could break heat records. Does this put athletes at risk?

  • June 18, 2024
The 2024 Summer Olympics in Paris could break heat records.  Does this put athletes at risk?

James Webb telescope helps improve technology

  • June 18, 2024
James Webb telescope helps improve technology

Kylian Mbappe broke his nose during France's 2024 Euro 2024 victory over Austria and may need surgery, reports say

  • June 18, 2024
Kylian Mbappe broke his nose during France's 2024 Euro 2024 victory over Austria and may need surgery, reports say

Approximately 100,000 pet insurance policies are being canceled nationwide

  • June 17, 2024
Approximately 100,000 pet insurance policies are being canceled nationwide

Here are our recommendations for the best 2024 nonfiction books : NPR

  • June 17, 2024
Here are our recommendations for the best 2024 nonfiction books : NPR