Startup introduces paintball-armed, AI-powered home security camera

It's a bold pitch to homeowners: What if you let a small tech startup's crowdfunded AI surveillance system deliver vigilante justice?

A Slovenia-based company called OZ-IT recently announced this PaintCam Eva, a range of autonomous property monitoring devices that use motion detection and facial recognition to protect against suspected intruders. At the company crazy promo videoa voiceover promises that Eve will protect owners from burglars, unwanted animal guests and any unfortunate passersby who don't heed the 'zero compliance, zero tolerance' warning.

The consequences of shaking off Eve's threats: being shot with paintballs, or maybe even tear gas pellets.

“Experience ultimate peace of mind,” PaintCam website declares, as Eve will offer owners a “perfect combination of video security and physical presence” thanks to its “unobtrusive [sic] design that is a beacon of safety.”

And for the naysayers who worried that Eve might indiscriminately bomb a neighbor's child with a bruising paintball volley, or accidentally throw riot control chemicals at an unsuspecting Amazon Prime delivery person? Have no fear: the robot's “EVA” AI system uses live video streaming to a user's app and uses facial recognition technology to allow designated people to pass unharmed.

In the company's promotional video, there appears to be a combination of automatic and manual screening options. At one point, Eve is shown verbally warning an intruder, requiring them to count down five seconds to leave the designated perimeter. If the stranger doesn't comply, Eve automatically fires a paintball at his chest. Later, a man watches from the livestream of his PaintCam app as his panicked daughter waves at Eve's camera to spare her boyfriend, which her father allows.

“When an unfamiliar face appears next to someone you know – perhaps your daughter's new boyfriend – PaintCam follows your instructions,” reads part product website.

Presumably, identifying pre-authorized visitors would involve storing 3D facial scans in Eve's system for future use. (Because facial recognition AI has such an accurate track record, without racial bias.) At the very least, require owners to purge any unknown newcomer. Either way, details are scarce on PaintCam's website.

PaintCam scan buddy gif
What true peace of mind looks like. Credit: PaintCam

But if New Atlas points out that there aren't really a lot of detailed specs or price ranges available yet, beyond the suburban appeal of crowd control gadgets. OZ-IT promises that Eve will include all the basic smart home security features such as live monitoring, night vision, object tracking, motion detection, night vision, as well as video storage and playback capabilities.

There are apparently “Standard”, “Advanced” and “Elite” versions of PaintCam Eve in the works. The basic level only offers owners 'smart security' and 'app on/off' capabilities, while Eve+ also offers animal detection. Eve Pro is apparently the only one to include facial recognition, implying that the other two models could be a little more… random in their surveillance methods. It's also unclear how much extra you'll have to spend for the tear gas level.

PaintCams Kickstarter will go live on April 23rd. There's no word yet on the release date, but once it does, the makers of Eve promise a “safer, more colorful future” for everyone. That's certainly one way to describe it.

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