Paradromics wants to make brain implants a reality before the end of this decade

  • Art
  • June 20, 2024

The following is a transcript of the video.

Matt Angle: The brain is a super fascinating organ. We have about 85 billion neurons and each neuron is a million times slower than a computer chip. And yet the brain does incredible things.

But what that means is that if you want to get data in and out of the brain, you have to be able to talk to a lot of different neurons at the same time. And that's where the emphasis on building these fast, high data rate devices came from.

My name is Matt Angle and I am the CEO and founder of Paradromics.

Paradromics' mission is to transform otherwise untreatable brain health problems into solvable technological problems. We are fundamentally building a medical device to address unmet needs.

What that does is it allows us to connect to the brain and receive data from the brain. These medical devices are prescribed by doctors. They are implanted in patients. And they are paid by private insurance companies.

I think a reasonable expectation for these types of devices would be around $100,000 per device.

The first patients to benefit from Paradromics technology will be patients who have lost the ability to communicate due to paralysis – people with ALS or spinal cord injury who are trying to regain normal communication with their families.

But the same type of device can also read out things, such as whether someone is depressed or whether someone is experiencing chronic pain. And so we see the real clinical impact of BCI [brain computer interfaces] is that it will become a first line for many people with neurological health problems.

Vikash Gilja: My name is Vikash Gilja. I am the Chief Scientific Officer at Paradromics. The reason we chose to focus on motor skills and speech is because they are well established in our research community and the science exists. And so Paradromics can use science and apply the right engineering to take us from research to medical devices. The Paradromics system involves implanting an electrode array in the brain.

This implanted device generates data and requires power. And so that data is sent through this cable, power is received through this cable by the cortical module.

This cable is then connected to an internal transceiver on the chest. This internal transceiver is designed to be completely implanted so that no wires or ports extend from the body.

And the way this is accomplished is that power is sent wirelessly to this device, and data is sent from this device to outside the body at high throughput. The device does not need to be charged.

All you have to do as a user is go through a short calibration routine to learn the mapping of electrical signals to intent. But once that mapping is learned, the system can be used.

And what we know from existing research in this area is that we can maintain that use for days or weeks.

Kimiko Nakajima: My name is Kimiko Nakajima. I'm working on developing processes or selecting the materials we want to use to build our cortical module, the brain implant part of our system.

This is the feedthrough, so the part that will fit into a package of our neural implant that will protect the computer chip in our implant. And I'm looking for any foreign material that might be on the surface of the part.

This is a neural implant and what we're looking at is the package that has a computer chip in it. And on this side of the package we have hundreds of electrodes that detect neural signals from the brain.

Each dot you can see on the screen is an electrode attached to the package. And one of the things we do in this inspection lab is make sure that these electrodes are properly attached to the packaging.

Hoek: Our first human trial will take place in 2025. I would expect that we would have commercial approval to sell it
product not earlier than 2029.

We see that the first million people to get brain computer interfaces will also use them to treat serious medical conditions.

I think in 20 years there could be a different conversation, and some of those devices could have consumer applications as well. But in the meantime, we're really focused on building safe, reliable, and robust devices for people with physical and mental conditions.

Related Posts

  • Art
  • July 19, 2024
  • 1 views
  • 2 minutes Read
Scientists find new target for RSV drug

Irish scientists led by a group from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how the dangerous Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) disables our immune response, opening up a new and exciting target…

  • Art
  • July 19, 2024
  • 3 views
  • 1 minute Read
The Trillion Dollar AI Time Bomb

PartShare article via FacebookShare article via TwitterShare article via LinkedInShare article via email There’s a ticking time bomb in the AI ​​space: spending is too high and returns are too…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You Missed

History of US Soccer at the Olympics: USWNT Success Defines Them, USMNT Returns After 16 Years

  • July 19, 2024
History of US Soccer at the Olympics: USWNT Success Defines Them, USMNT Returns After 16 Years

Chinese make their own cooking oil after scandal raises concerns

  • July 19, 2024
Chinese make their own cooking oil after scandal raises concerns

Connecting an antenna to a TV: watch movies, series and sports for free

  • July 19, 2024
Connecting an antenna to a TV: watch movies, series and sports for free

A Guide to Your Weekend Viewing and Reading Pleasure: NPR

  • July 19, 2024
A Guide to Your Weekend Viewing and Reading Pleasure: NPR

What You Need to Know About Airline Refunds and Delays

  • July 19, 2024
What You Need to Know About Airline Refunds and Delays

NFL kickoff rules for 2024 could create excitement…and chaos: 'It's going to be a show'

  • July 19, 2024
NFL kickoff rules for 2024 could create excitement…and chaos: 'It's going to be a show'

European markets: open to closed

  • July 19, 2024
European markets: open to closed

Investors are betting on the 'Trump trade'. Here's what it means.

  • July 19, 2024
Investors are betting on the 'Trump trade'. Here's what it means.

Scientists find new target for RSV drug

  • July 19, 2024
Scientists find new target for RSV drug

DOJ says largest housing provider for migrant children involved in widespread sexual abuse

  • July 19, 2024
DOJ says largest housing provider for migrant children involved in widespread sexual abuse

Video shows reclusive tribe searching for food on Amazon beach

  • July 19, 2024
Video shows reclusive tribe searching for food on Amazon beach