New Cyberattack Targets iPhone Apple IDs. Here’s How to Protect Your Data.

A new cyberattack is targeting iPhone users, with criminals attempting to obtain individuals' Apple IDs in a “phishing” campaign, security software company Symantec reports. said in a warning on Monday.

Cybercriminals are sending text messages to iPhone users in the US that appear to come from Apple, but are in fact intended to steal victims' personal data.

“Phishing actors continue to target Apple IDs due to their widespread use, which provides access to a large number of potential victims,” ​​Symantec said. “These credentials are highly valuable, offering control over devices, access to personal and financial information, and potential revenue through unauthorized purchases.”

Consumers are also more likely to trust communications that appear to come from a trusted brand like Apple, warned Symantec, which is owned by Broadcom, a maker of semiconductors and infrastructure software.

The malicious text messages appear to come from Apple and encourage recipients to click a link and sign in to their iCloud accounts. For example, a phishing text message might say: “Apple important iCloud request: visit to sign in[.]authenticate connection[.]info/icloud to continue using your services.” Recipients are also asked to complete a CAPTCHA to appear legitimate, before being taken to a fake iCloud login page.

Such cyberattacks are often called “smishing,” where criminals use fake text messages from supposedly trustworthy organizations instead of email to trick people into sharing personal information, such as account passwords and credit card details.

How to Protect Yourself

Be careful when opening text messages that appear to be sent by Apple. Always check the source of the message: if it comes from a random phone number, the iPhone maker is almost certainly not the sender. iPhone users should also avoid clicking on links that invite people to access their iCloud account; instead, go directly to login pages.

“If you're suspicious about an unexpected message, phone call, or request for personal information, such as your email address, phone number, password, security code, or money, it's safer to assume it's a scam. If necessary, contact the company directly,” Apple said in a statement after about avoiding scams.

Apple urges users to always multi-factor authentication for Apple ID for added security and to make it harder to access your account from another device. It's “designed to help ensure that you're the only person who can access your account,” Apple said.

Apple adds that its own support staff will never send users a link to a website asking them to sign in or enter your password, device passcode, or two-factor authentication code.

“If someone claiming to be from Apple asks you for any of the above, they are a scammer engaged in a social engineering attack. Hang up the call or otherwise end contact with them,” the company said. said.

Other tips to prevent smishing fraud, according to the government watchdogs:

  • Set your computer and mobile phone to automatically update security software
  • Never click on links, never respond to text messages, and never call unknown phone numbers.
  • Never respond to unknown text messages, even if you are asked to text “STOP” to end the messages.
  • Remove suspicious texts
  • If you receive a text message that appears to be from a company or government agency, check your account or go online to verify the contact information

The key to safety: “Stop before you react and avoid the urge to react.” according to to the Federal Communications Commission.

Related Posts

Not to inflame tempers, but chickens blush

Emotions are so hot right now. They took on a new form in this summer's blockbuster Inside Out 2 and stress is so contagious that our dogs can sense it.…

Nvidia's latest AI offering could spark a gold rush for custom models

Sign up for our daily and weekly newsletters for the latest updates and exclusive content on industry-leading AI coverage. Learn more Nvidia has quietly unveiled its new AI Foundry service…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You Missed

Nvidia supplier SK Hynix posts highest profit in 6 years on AI chip boom

  • July 25, 2024
Nvidia supplier SK Hynix posts highest profit in 6 years on AI chip boom

hedge fund manager Dan Niles

  • July 25, 2024
hedge fund manager Dan Niles

Not to inflame tempers, but chickens blush

  • July 25, 2024
Not to inflame tempers, but chickens blush

Chinese EV startups spend more on research than Tesla

  • July 25, 2024
Chinese EV startups spend more on research than Tesla

Biden explains post-election exit, praises Harris over Trump

  • July 25, 2024
Biden explains post-election exit, praises Harris over Trump

'Inside Out 2' is the highest-grossing animated film ever, surpassing 'Frozen 2'

  • July 25, 2024
'Inside Out 2' is the highest-grossing animated film ever, surpassing 'Frozen 2'

LeVar Burton Talks His Changing Definition of Success on NPR's 'Wild Card' : NPR

  • July 25, 2024
LeVar Burton Talks His Changing Definition of Success on NPR's 'Wild Card' : NPR

Doctors react to Biden's live address to nation, concerned about 'lack of emotion'

  • July 25, 2024
Doctors react to Biden's live address to nation, concerned about 'lack of emotion'

USWNT defender Tierna Davidson on 'difficult situation' created by Korbin Albert's anti-LGBTQ posts

  • July 25, 2024
USWNT defender Tierna Davidson on 'difficult situation' created by Korbin Albert's anti-LGBTQ posts

South Korea GDP, Wall Street Sell-Off

  • July 25, 2024
South Korea GDP, Wall Street Sell-Off

This Retirement Misstep Could Cost You More Than $100,000 in Savings. Here’s What You Need to Know.

  • July 25, 2024
This Retirement Misstep Could Cost You More Than $100,000 in Savings. Here’s What You Need to Know.